Open Door

Open Door
Indianapolis, Indiana

Project Proposal





Horner House Preservation Project
Project Proposal

Prepared by: Mary J. Williams
04/19/2011






Common Names and Definitions 

Definitions for the common names and terms used in this document are defined below:
Common Name / Term
Definition
Corbel
An architectural bracket or block projecting from a wall and supporting (or appearing to support) a ceiling, beam or shelf
Cornice
The uppermost section of moldings along the top of a wall or just below a roof
Dormer
A window which is set vertically on a sloping roof. The dormer has its own roof, which may be flat, arched or pointed.
Gable
The triangle formed by a sloping roof. A building may be front-gabled or side-gabled.
Mansard roof
A roof type with two slopes on each of the four sides. The lower slope is steeper than the upper slope. Dormers are often set in the lower slope. The upper slope is usually not visible from the ground.
Preserve
To keep alive, intact or free from decay - maintain
R. Eric & Amanda J. Browning
The new owners – purchasing the property
Rehabilitate
To restore or bring to a condition of health or useful and constructive activity
Wythe
A continuous vertical section of masonry one unit in thickness. A wythe may be independent of, or interlocked with, the adjoining wythe(s).







Section 1

Overview


Summary         

Project Name:                                Horner House Preservation Project
Project Cost:                                      TBD
Proposed by:                                      R. Eric and Amanda J. Browning
Address:                                             129 South Eighth Avenue
                                                            Beech Grove, Indiana 46107
Prepared by:                                      Mary J. Williams
Preparation Date:                                 04/19/2011




Introduction

The overall project is to purchase the Horner House property (410 & 416 South Emerson Avenue, Indianapolis, IN), to rehabilitate the exterior of the historic Horner House and to preserve the second house on the property. This document is the proposal regarding how the project will proceed.

The Horner House was built between 1875 and 1876 and is one of only a handful of Second Empire houses remaining in Indianapolis. The property and house have had numerous owners over the past 136 years. There have been many changes to the structure of the house during this time. The Horner House has been standing empty for years and is in a grave state of disrepair. The rear wall of the rear wing has partially collapsed resulting in the failure of the first and second story floors. In order to rehabilitate the house, the exterior will need to be stabilized and made watertight. Without well-timed intervention, the home is in danger of being condemned and razed by the city.

The second house is a circa 1910’s bungalow that was moved to the property between 1950 and 1960. It was occupied until approximately 1 year ago and is currently in fair condition overall. Some repairs will need to be completed, the house thoroughly cleaned and the interior painted prior to occupancy. The majority of the remaining issues are cosmetic in nature.

The Horner House property is currently owned by The Indiana Land Bank of the City of Indianapolis. Indiana Landmarks is proposing to purchase the property and sell to R. Eric and Amanda J. Browning for $2,500 plus expenses for a total of $3,000.00. Indiana Landmarks has agreed to stabilize and rebuild the rear wall of the Horner House prior to the purchase. 




Property History


Finding the history of the Horner House has not been easy and the search is far from finished. Most of the information has been found at the Marion County Central Library, the Irvington Historical Society or on Ancestry.com.

The style of the Horner House is easy to determine. It is an excellent, albeit fairly rare, example of Second Empire architecture. The 1875 - 1876 construction dates are during the style’s most popular period of 1865 to 1880. Even in its current dilapidated state, its most noteworthy features include the 3 story tower, mansard roof with dormer windows, bay window, and stone keystones over the arched windows. These features are consistent with Second Empire houses constructed in the United States during that time, and this house is a rare surviving example of the later development of Second Empire style, with the masses and asymmetrical floor plan of the Italian Villa style combined with the Second Empire mansard roofs and tower.

Initially, the only clue to the property’s history was an Indiana Landmarks reference to a 1932 Indianapolis Star article about the house. The Marion County Central Library supplied copies of the article, titled “Old Houses With Towers Examples of Dignified Style of Architecture.” It was written by Agnes M’Culloch Hanna and is dated February 4th. It contains the earliest known photograph of the house. She notes that the house was built in 1875 by Abraham Horner whose daughter, Rose, went to Butler College. She also mentions that the property began as part of 80 acres taken from the government in 1821 by Harvey Pope. The property then changed hands several times before becoming lot No. 1 of Downey & Brouse Addition which was platted in 1875 as an addition to Irvington.

Per the 1932 Indianapolis Star article, Abraham Horner built the Horner House in 1875. Horner genealogy reveals Abraham Horner of Ohio purchased 80 acres of land in Montgomery County, Indiana in 1825. The 1850 US Census in Montgomery County shows Abraham and his wife, Hannah, had 4 sons including 17 year old Abraham. This would indicate he was born in Ohio in 1825, the same year that his father purchased the land in Indiana. Abraham married Emma Z. Rose on October 12, 1859 in Boone County, IN. They apparently moved back to Montgomery County because Abram Horner of Crawfordsville enlisted as a private in the Union Army on July 11, 1863. He mustered out on July 17, 1863 after participating in the deployment to stop Morgan’s Raiders. Henry Brouse was Abraham’s Major for the short time he was in the army. (See Appendix B for story) 

The 1870 Census finds Abram Horner, now 44, in Center Township, Boone County, Indiana with his daughter, Emma R, age 9. They are living with Emma Z’s family, who run a hotel. Emma Z is found in the Census for Marion County, Indiana. She is listed as a patient at the Indianapolis Surgery Institute. In 1880, Abraham Horner, age 55, is living at 90 North New Jersey (west side of street), Indianapolis. His wife Emma Z, age 35, is keeping house and their daughter, Rose E (Emma R), age 19 is at home. Later that year, on September 2nd, Emma R married Harry Olmstead of Indianapolis. After 1880, the Indianapolis City Directories showed Abraham and Rose living at different addresses.

In the book, Greater Irvington: Architecture, People and Places on the Indianapolis Eastside, Paul Diebold states that it wasn’t Abraham Horner but Abraham Hannah who built the house. Per the book, “The proper name, as Hanna relates, should be the Abraham Hannah House, but early abstract recorders miscopied the name as Horner.” Ms. Hanna also refers to Abraham Horner as Abraham Harner in one paragraph. Census searches for Abraham Harner and Abraham Hannah, with daughter Rose returns no results. Without further research, it is reasonable to conclude that Abraham Horner built the house. Additional research will be completed to attempt to determine more conclusively the date and original owner of the house.

Per Ms. Hanna’s Star article, the house was sold to Mahala Shoemaker after a year and then changed hands several more times. Multiple genealogical searches were completed on the names of the families mentioned by Ms. Hanna, Oscar Turrell and James L. Thompson. Mahala Shoemaker was married to John C. Shoemaker. In the 1870 census, they are farming in Perry County, Indiana. By 1879, they are in Indianapolis and John is President of the Sentinel Co. In the 1879 – 1883 City Directories, they live at 4 different addresses, all located downtown. No evidence has yet been found that they lived in Irvington or the Horner House. Oscar Turrell was located in Irvington in 1886 & 1887. The City Directories do not give street names or numbers for those living in Irvington. From 1889 until 1893, James L Thompson lives in Irvington. He is listed as the County Commissioner.

 According to the Irvington Historical Society, the name of the street changed from National Avenue to Emerson Avenue some time before Irvington was annexed in 1911. Thus far in the research, there is no conclusive evidence who owned the house between Abraham Horner and Silas F. Fleece. It does appear, however, that both Oscar Turrell and James L. Thompson may have lived there. This leaves a gap, between approximately 1877 and 1900, in the history of the house.

Again, genealogy searches were conducted, this time on Silas F. Fleece. Silas Fleece came from an influential Hendricks County family. Four generations of his family were written up in History of Hendricks County, Indiana: her people, industries and institutions (1917). In the 1880 Census, Silas F. Fleece and his new wife Frances (Fannie) are living in North Salem, Hendricks County, Indiana. He is working as a grocer. (Ms. Hanna indicates Silas is from “down the state”. It is possible someone confused North Salem, in Hendricks County, with Salem, in Washington County.) In the early 1890’s, Silas and family are living in Indianapolis at 90 Highland Place. By the 1900 Census, Silas is living at 504 South Emerson Avenue, Irvington, Indiana with his family. He is 42 and a general agent. His family includes his wife Frances 45, daughters, Letha 17 & Alta 15, and son, Verner 10. In 1900 there are only 2 homes on South Emerson, 504 & 512. This is consistent with accounts that few houses were built in the area before 1900.

In the 1910 Census, Silas’ address changed to 410 South Emerson Avenue. Silas F Fleece is 51 with an occupation of gas business installing fixtures. Other members of his household include his wife, Frances, 55 and his son, Verner, a 20 year old salesman in the gas business. Given that the Indianapolis lot numbering system changed several times between 1880 and 1900, the conclusion is that 504 South Emerson is the current 410 South Emerson house. A 1912 Indianapolis Star article indicates that the married daughters were home for Christmas at 410 South Emerson. Neither Silas nor Frances can be found in the 1920 Census. Their son, Verner, is found on East New York Street, with his wife, Katherine. It is not known when Silas and his family purchased the house; however, we know that they were there for at least 12 years, between 1900 and 1912. In Ms. Hanna’s article, she states that the house was deeded from Fleece to George Tyrell, however, there is no record found of George owning the home until 1920.

In the 1900 & 1910 Censuses, George Tyrell and his wife, Mary, are living in Versailles, IN. Their daughters are May (Mabel) and Fay (twins) and Norma. In the January 1920 Census, the family except for May, are in Indianapolis renting a home on East Washington Street. By August they are living in the Horner House according to an article in the August 3, 1920 Indianapolis Star.  The spelling of their last name has changed from Tyrell to Terrill. George, 63, is a consultant with the State and Fay Etta, 28, is a high school teacher. The family is still in the house during the 1930 Census. If his age is correct in the Census, George was 75 years old when Ms. Hanna wrote her article on the house. By 1942, the City Directory lists Fay Terrill as living at 5822 E. Washington St.

In the same 1942 City Directory, the Horner House is listed as vacant. It is not listed and so presumed vacant in the 1943, 1947 & 1949 Directories. In 1951, a single person, Vivian (Patty) Douglas, lives in the house in Apartment #5. Not all the City Directories are available on line. In future trips to the library, additional years will be filled in if possible.

It is our understanding that the property, which included the addition of the bungalow, was purchased in the early 1970s. It doesn’t appear the house was ever lived in again. The owners lost the house to the city of Indianapolis around 2009. There was some maintenance completed but not enough to keep the house from falling into its current condition. As it stands, it is adding to the decline of the overall neighborhood.

Stabilization of the Horner House, which anchors the southwest side of Irvington, may help to stabilize the neighborhood. By rehabilitating and occupying both residences, it is hoped the neighborhood will start to turn around. Research into both the history and original structure of the house will be continued as the project progresses. It is possible that the title insurance commitment will give additional clues as to the ownership history; otherwise, it is our plan to research ownership further at the County Recorder’s Office.

“The destruction of the past is perhaps the greatest of all crimes.” Simone Weil



 

Objectives


At a very high level:

  • To purchase the property from Indiana Landmarks
  • To make both houses and the garage watertight and secure  
  • To rehabilitate the exterior of the Horner House and preserve the Bungalow
  • To repair the interior of the houses so that they may both be occupied
  • To obtain additional funding for the required work




Current State / Desired State 


The current state of the property has been documented in photos from March and April 2011. (Appendix A)

The Horner House is in need of immediate attention. The interior and exterior are badly deteriorated and the building has not been watertight for a long while. Nearly every system of the exterior will need major repairs or replacement including the roof, gutters, masonry, windows and foundation. There are remnants of a foundation for a bay window that has been removed on the south elevation. There is also a large hole in the south wall that is currently partially covered with plywood. The west wall of the rear wing has partially collapsed, along with the main and second floor in that wing. There are some interior elements that will be rehabilitated if possible, including some woodwork, the front stairs and entry way, the first floor plaster moldings, and all fireplaces. The plumbing, electrical and HVAC systems will all need to be replaced including hardware and fixtures. Most walls, ceilings, floors and fixtures will need to be replaced or repaired. The interior needs to have the rubbish removed and floors stabilized before much of the exterior work can be started.

Bob Ladisich, a structural engineer with Level 5 Engineering, did a high level review of the Horner House. Overall the house is structurally sound, but there are several areas of concern. The southeast corner of the house has been impacted by water due to the lack of gutters and proper downspouts. The west wall of the west wing will need to be restored. The north wall of the west wing needs work above the cellar entrance, but is otherwise sound. The south wall of the west wing will need to be rebuilt from the southwest corner to approximately the west edge of the first window. At the southeast corner of the house, the front brick wythe behind the limestone facing has crumbled and needs rebricked. The interior wythe will possibly also need rebricked, depending upon the amount of damage and how long the repairs are delayed.

The bungalow will require a number of repairs to ensure it does not develop additional problems. At the least, some of the gutters, dormer and gable shingles and roofing will need to be replaced or repaired and painted. The HVAC and kitchen floor will need to be replaced. The kitchen and baths need to be thoroughly cleaned and painted. Bathroom fixtures and floors may need to be replaced.  A more thorough evaluation will need to be completed after the purchase, when there is free access to the property.

The grounds of the property are strewn with trash and salvage which will need to be removed in order to keep the grass mowed. There is a hodge-podge of fencing that will need to be removed, repaired or replaced. The garage will need to be stabilized in order to use it for storage of equipment and materials during the project. The sidewalks and driveway will require some additional cleanup and repair.

The phase one desired state of the property will be discussed in more detail in Section 2, including how the replacements/repairs relate to Department of the Interior Preservation Briefs.

The object of this proposal (which is phase one of the overall project) will be to rehabilitate the exterior of Horner House as it now stands. In addition, the bay that has been removed on the south side of the house will be replaced. The entire exterior will be stabilized and the current architectural features rehabilitated. The interior of the house will be improved so that the house is habitable. The Bungalow’s exterior and interior will be cleaned up and repaired so that it is habitable. The grounds will be made neat and tidy with appropriate fencing. The current garage will be demolished at the end of this phase of the overall project.

The initial phase will include limited maintenance on the Bungalow. It will be stabilized, cleaned and some limited painting and repair completed. The goal for the Bungalow is to become the residence of the new owners. In addition, the new owners will be moving their business into the Bungalow and seeking a zoning variance. This will give them close proximity to work on and observe the property for security purposes. Once the owners move their residence to the Horner House, it is intended that the Bungalow be fully utilized as the headquarters of their business.

In future planned phases and proposals, work will be completed to restore the original 4th floor tower, original front porch, and reconstruction of a west side addition to of the Horner House. There will also be phases and proposals to further preserve the Bungalow and grounds, and construct new garages. The timing of these additional phases will be dependent on funds and priorities.




Requirements 


A representative of Indiana Landmarks will work with the proposed new owners to determine the requirements, methods and materials used on the exterior of the property. All negotiations will take into consideration the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitation and Illustrated Guidelines for Rehabilitating Historic Buildings, the National Park Service’s Preservation Briefs, and actual examples of historic and preservation practice.  Interior work will be left to the discretion of the proposed new owners and will be in compliance with all state and local housing codes and laws. All interior work detailed in this proposal is for informational purposes only. Additional details are included in Section 2.






In Scope Items and Deliverables 


The following in scope items and deliverables are at a high level and additional details are included in Section 2.

Overall Project
·         Project planning – organization and management
·         Purchase of property
·         Additional research – property and ownership
·         Property preparation – cleanup and securing of yard
·         Garage – stabilization and security
·         Fence – construction fence to be installed and replaced at the end of the project by appropriate replacement

Exterior Work
·         Horner House
o    Secure building and cleanup
o    Flat and mansard roof – repair/replace bladder and slate roof, install roof vents
o    Soffits, gutters & downspouts – repair/replace
o    Foundation and stone facing – repair/replace
o    Masonry – remove ivy and clean/repair/replace bricks and mortar, as necessary
o    Hole in south wall – rebuild bay window to match north wall
o    Windows – repair/replace hardware, glass and frames  
o    Corbels and decorative trim – repair/replace
o    Doors – repair/replace exterior doors and hardware
·         Bungalow
o    Secure building and clean-up
o    Roof – inspect and repair, if leaking
o    Windows -  replace broken glass
o    Exterior – minimal shingle repair on gables and dormers, repaint

Interior Work
·         Horner House
o    Overall – remove trash and rubble
o    Sewer Riser – design interior sewer drain location and install main sewer riser prior to roof rehabilitation
o    Floors – stabilize/repair and replace floors in rear wing and main house, both upper and lower
o    Stairway – stabilize/shore up and protect during construction
·         Bungalow
o    Overall – remove trash and rubble and clean throughout
o    Basement – clean and repair to ensure watertight
o    Floors – remove old carpet and kitchen tile
o    Walls and ceilings – repaint  throughout
o    Mechanical Systems – repair/replace electric service, plumbing and HVAC
o    Baths – repair/replace sinks, toilets, tub/shower, cabinets and lighting fixtures
o    Kitchen – repair/replace sink, countertop, cabinets and appliances






Out of Scope Items 


The items that are out of scope of the project are listed below.

Exterior Work
·         Horner House
o    4th floor tower – will not be replaced
o    Cresting on roof and bays – will not be replaced
o    Original covered front porch – will not be replaced
o    Garage – will not be replaced
o    West side addition – will not be replaced
o    Second driveway – will not be installed
·         Bungalow
o    No additional work will be completed on the exterior except that already in scope

Interior Work
·         Horner House
o    Except for the work specifically included in scope, all other interior work will be included in the overall timeline but is out of scope for the purposes of this proposal unless required to complete the in scope items
·         Bungalow
o    Except for the work specifically included in scope, all other interior work will be included in the overall timeline but is out of scope for the purposes of this proposal unless required to keep the Bungalow stable




Assumptions and Constraints 


  • Other than the back wall of the rear wing, west elevation of the Horner House, there is no major structural damage to either house
  • The City of Indianapolis and Indiana Landmarks will work with the new owners regarding time and monetary constraints
  • Indiana Landmarks will stabilize the back (west) wall of the Horner House prior to closing
  • Indiana Landmarks will rebuild the west wall after new owners remove the rubble from the wall collapse
  • The new owners will prioritize the work on the Bungalow and move in prior to the majority of the work on the Horner House and property
  • Indiana Landmarks will approve an extended timeline due to the significant damage to the Horner House and work being required on both houses
  • The new owners will keep Indiana Landmarks informed of work completed each month, detailing issues and changes to the timeline either verbally, by email or by US mail
  • The Health and Hospital Corporation of Marion County will be updated regularly regarding progress addressing the issues over which they have authority
  • Funding for the project can be obtained
  • The new owners will be completing a significant part of the work themselves
  • There will be no delays in acquiring services or materials
  • The attached timeline is based on a limited inspection of the property and there are many unknowns and variables
  • Indiana Landmarks will be supportive of splitting the property into 2 parcels and rezoning the Bungalow portion of the property to allow commercial occupancy
  • All interior design and work will be determined solely by the new owners, will not be subject to the guidelines of the National Park Service or the Secretary of the Interior and will not be inspected or influenced by Indiana Landmarks
  • The guidelines of the National Park Service and Standards of the Secretary of the Interior will be used only as guidelines by the new owners and Indiana Landmarks in determining work to be completed on the exterior of the buildings and methods to be used
  • Per the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitation and Illustrated Guidelines, “The Standards are to be applied to specific rehabilitation projects in a reasonable manner, taking into consideration economic and technical feasibility”
  • The new owners and Indiana Landmarks will use actual historical evidence, historical documentation or evidence of previously approved preservation practice to determine the final exterior details and architecture, and to preserve the property’s historical significance




Related Projects and Project Impacts 


The new owners own and operate a land surveying company, A R E Surveying Consultants, Inc. It is a growing company, demanding much of their time during the height of their busy season. While the new owners will make every effort to keep the demands of their business from impacting the project timeline, there may be times when the timeline will be impacted.







Section 2

Detailed Proposal


Property Overview

#1

Lot

Existing feature and detailed condition: The lot has a fair amount of work that needs to be completed; however, there are no major earthwork issues. It is a large lot with 2 houses. There is a lot of overgrowth that will require cleaning up.

Photo #   1 – 14  
Proposed work, materials and standards: The trash, leaves and overgrowth will be removed from the yard. The piles of dressed stone, marble pillars, etc. will be removed. The cisterns will be filled and capped. The building materials from the collapsed back wall will be disposed of according to local regulations. If there are any undamaged bricks or other materials, they will be salvaged and reused.

There will be no impact on significant historic materials or designs, and the historic building will be enhanced by a clean and tidy yard.

#2

Fencing

Existing feature and detailed condition: There are multiple types of fencing on the property, including wrought iron, wooden, corrugated metal and chain link. The wrought iron is mismatched and disjointed in appearance. Some of the wooden fencing is dilapidated and rotten. Poison ivy is growing uncontrolled around the fencing.

2010 Yahoo! maps of the property show a chain link fence across the front of the Horner House. There was also wooden privacy fencing enclosing the back yard and beside the driveway. Much of the fencing is gone and appears to have been scavenged from the property. In addition, other items have been removed from the property.

Photo #  1, 15 - 21
Proposed work, materials and standards: The condition of the fencing will be further evaluated.

Chain Link – The installation of the chain link fence in the rear yard behind the Bungalow will be completed to secure the yard. (At some point in the future, when the owners move to the Horner House, appropriate, affordable fencing will be added to the back yard for the owners’ dogs.)

Wrought Iron - If any wrought iron fencing is determined to be original to the property and is salvageable, it will be cleaned of flaking paint and rust with a wire brush, primed and repainted.

Corrugated metal – All corrugated metal fencing will be removed and replaced with more appropriate fencing.

Wooden - If any wooden fencing is salvageable and is appropriate to keep, it will be cleaned, primed and painted or stained. The dilapidated perimeter fencing will be demolished. The interior fencing will be removed.

The poison ivy will be treated, cut down and removed from the property.

A temporary construction fence will be installed around the perimeter of the property. The construction fencing will help to secure the property and ensure that no more salvaging takes place on the property. (Several items have disappeared from the yard in the past 2 months.) The construction fence will be removed when the majority of the exterior work is completed.

There will be no impact on significant historic materials or designs. The house will be enhanced by removal of hodge-podge of deteriorating fencing and the historic buildings will be protected by proper security during the project.
#3

Landscaping

Existing feature and detailed condition: There are mulberry trees growing near the house and fencing. There is a large honey locust tree near the house which will make it difficult to keep the yard properly mowed.

Photo #  20 & 22  
Proposed work, materials and standards:  The mulberry trees will be removed from around the house and fencing. The honey locust tree, located near the house, will be cut down and removed.

Additional landscaping will be completed at the end of the overall project.

There will be no impact on significant historic materials or designs.
#4

Garage

Existing feature and detailed condition: One-story frame detached wood sided garage in poor condition. This large, 3-bay garage is at the rear of the property between both houses. It does not appear to be original to the property.

Some areas of the garage show evidence of termite damage including the rafters. It is not known if there is a current active infestation.

The garage is currently full of refuse. The roof appears to be leaking in several places. There are broken windows and only part of the exterior has been painted. Some exterior areas of the garage are covered with old barn siding and metal panels. There are several complaints against the garage by the Health and Hospital Corporation of Marion County.

Photo #  22 - 28              
Proposed work, materials and standards:

A detailed evaluation of garage will be conducted to determine whether minimal repair will stabilize the building. It will be used for storage of materials during the preservation of the house.

The Health and Hospital Corporation of Marion County will be contacted for a more detailed list of additional corrections to be made to the property.

The garage will be tested for termites and treated if necessary. The rafters will be reinforced and any other infested/damaged areas will be repaired.

The refuse in the garage will be removed. All repairs to make the building safe will be completed; including patching the roof, replacing broken windows, patching the hole in rear wall and painting the exterior. Any other repairs identified to make the garage secure will be completed, including new locks for doors.

The garage will be demolished when the preservation of the Horner House is complete.

There will be no impact on significant historic materials or designs at the end of the project when the garage is removed. By retaining the garage until the end of the project the material and tools will be secure during the project.
#5

Driveway

Existing feature and detailed condition:  The driveway is in fair condition. There is some grass & weeds breaking through and there is inadequate gravel.

Photo #  9                      
Proposed work, materials and standards:

The weeds and grass will be removed from the driveway. A truckload of gravel will be spread on the driveway.

There will be no impact on significant historic materials or designs and the driveway will remain usable.
#6

Front walkways

Existing feature and detailed condition: The front walk of Bungalow is in fair condition. There are several large areas of missing sidewalk in front of the Horner House. There is some gravel & debris on the walks. The front steps of the Horner House have some areas that have crumbled.

Photo #   11               
Proposed work, materials and standards: The walk ways for the houses will be cleaned up and the grass between the cracks removed. The front steps of the Horner House will be repaired.

Prior to the removal of the construction fence, the missing pieces of sidewalk in front of the Horner House will be replaced.

There will be no impact on significant historic materials or designs.
#7

Open cellar

Existing feature and detailed condition: There are areas of the cellar that are exposed from above but are partially beneath the rear wall and are currently covered by plywood. 

Photo # not available 
Proposed work, materials and standards: After removal of the rear wall debris, the open cellar will be evaluated and covered temporarily for safety reasons. A more permanent solution will be finalized and executed during the initial phase of the project.

There will be no impact on significant historic materials or designs while maintaining a safe worksite.



Horner House – 2nd Empire circa 1875
Overview Photos # 29 & 30

#1

Roof

Existing feature and detailed condition: The majority of the evaluation of the roof has been from ground level. The flat portions of the roofs cannot be seen from the street due to the low pitch and cornices. From the condition of the interior of the house, it appears that the roof has been leaking for quite some time. It is likely that much of the roof needs to be re-decked and some supporting beams replaced. In general, it appears that the roof has not been maintained for many years and is in an advanced stage of deterioration. Due to the current condition of the roof, some of the restoration details will be supplied by the 1930’s photo.

The main house and rear wing have mansard roofs consisting of bladder type roofing on the flat portions and standard slate on the sides. The bladders are no longer watertight. There were cornices at the top, soffits with gutters at the bottom and painted boards at the ridges. Many of these pieces are seriously deteriorated or missing. The slate on the side surfaces has been painted, dark red and a light gray. Areas of the slate that were previously hidden but are now visible are a medium gray color. The shingles are laid in a very distinctive pattern; however, many have broken or fallen off and the decking is exposed. The roofing around all the dormer windows is deteriorated. The dormer window sills and adjacent roofing are missing for most of them.

Special Problem areas: A large portion of the rear wing roof is covered in ivy. A portion of the mansard roof above the rear wing has had all the slate shingles removed and has been covered in what looks like tar. On the south side of the main house, the mansard roof from the chimney to the west corner has had the slate removed and has been replaced with asphalt shingles. It appears the 2 windows in the mansard roof above the exposed roof sole plate at the back of the rear wing are at risk of falling.

The tower has only a very low-pitched roof where the tower has been removed. The bay window roof is covered with a bladder-type roofing. It appears wrinkled, in bad repair with a large area covered with shards of glass from a broken window. Both roofs have cornices. Originally, there was wrought iron cresting on the tower and bay window roofs. These no longer exist.


Photo #  33 – 43        


Proposed work, materials and standards: Per the Department of the Interior Preservation Brief No. 29, if 20% or more of the slates on a roof or roof slope are broken, cracked, missing or sliding out of position, it is usually less expensive to replace the roof than to execute individual repairs. This is especially true of older roofs nearing the end of their serviceable lives because even the most experienced slater will likely damage additional slates while attempting repairs. Depending on the age of the slate, its expected serviceable life, and the cause(s) of deterioration, it may or may not be cost effective to salvage slates.

Also, per the Standards, if using the same kind of material is not technically or economically feasible, then a compatible substitute material may be considered.

The original roof of the Horner House greatly added to the character of the house, however, due to the age of the roof and present condition, all areas of the roof will be replaced. Slates will not be salvaged due to their age, condition and paint.

Initially, the roof will be covered with tarps in order to stop the water damage until the roof project can be started.

The roof sections will be addressed one at a time in order to limit possible weather impacts to exposed or open roof areas. The ivy will be removed from the roof. Special care will be used, especially on the rear wing roof, to prevent additional damage to the brick during this process.

All existing roofing will be removed to the decking. Roofing, including slates, will be disposed of using current local and EPA guidelines. Roof structure and decking will be repaired and replaced as necessary, maintaining the existing configuration. Additional repairs will be completed at this time. The 3rd floor dormer windows in the mansard roof will be rebuilt using whatever existing materials are salvageable and replacing what is missing. (More in window section.)  The four 2nd floor windows in the mansard roof of the rear wing will be rebuilt using whatever existing materials are salvageable and replacing what is missing. The chimneys will be re-pointed and cleaned. The entire roof will be covered with a membrane/bladder or roll roofing as a temporary watertight solution. New temporary gutters and downspouts will be installed.

A final evaluation of roofing solutions will take place while the brick is being restored. It appears there are 3 options:
·         New roof of slate shingles replicating the current slate design
·         New roof of half-slate shingles replicating the current slate designs – This product is called TruSlate. Details of this product are included in Appendix B.
·         New roof of synthetic slate shingles replicating the current slate designs. There are several different types available on the market today.
At this time, the new owner is seriously considering the TruSlate product. This roof would be covered with real slate and is guaranteed for 50 years. It can be installed for less than half the price of slate.

Current quotes for a new slate roof are approximately $68,000.00. This does not include the costs of replacing the decking, fascia, trusses or dormers. Slate will only be an option if additional funds can be raised.

After the project to restore/re-point the brick, the new roof will be installed along with the new copper flashings, soffits and copper gutters, as well as new cornices and corbels.

Impact will be the restoration of the original roof configuration, protection of the building’s structural integrity and replacement of important architectural details.
#2

Gutters, Downspouts and Soffits

Existing feature and detailed condition:  Built-in metal-lined gutters and soffits along all sides of flat & mansard roofs.  They are seriously deteriorated or missing. Existing downspouts are mostly useless due to missing gutters. No ground-level drainage is provided for the downspouts, and rainwater is dropping directly against the foundation.

Photo # 33 & 44             
Proposed work, materials and standards: Temporary gutters and downspouts will be installed.

After the new roof is installed and brick restoration is completed, gutters and cornices will be rebuilt in their historic configuration. Existing downspouts will be replaced with new PVC downspouts in appropriate locations. Leaders will be installed at the foot of each downspout to carry rainwater away from the foundation.

Impact will be the restoration of the gutter and soffit configuration, protection of the building’s structural integrity and replacement of important architectural details and the historic building will be protected by proper drainage of rainwater. The only change will be to use PVC downspouts to deter theft.
#3

Foundation

Existing feature and detailed condition: Brick foundation of unknown condition is currently mostly hidden behind large limestone facings. The facings are missing on the northwest and southwest corners of the main wing. The uncovered areas of the foundation on the main wing of the house appear to have some crumbling bricks and missing mortar. Several corners of the east side of the main house have had water from downspouts pouring directly between the facings and the foundation.

The rear wing has no facings and the foundation has missing bricks and appears to be in very poor condition.

Some of the limestone facings are partially covered with ivy.

There are foundation remains of a south porch and presumed old west facing addition. There is also foundational evidence and remains of a bay window area of the dining room that correspond with a covered hole in the dining room wall.


Photo #   44 -50 











#3 cont.      
Proposed work, materials and standards: The foundation will remain in its current configuration with the exception of the south porch, presumed old west facing addition and south bay window. The south porch and west facing addition foundational elements will be documented and removed. A new foundation will be built in order to replace the old bay window area of the dining room. This will restore the house to its presumed original configuration.

The limestone facings will be removed and a full evaluation will be made of work to be done. The limestone facings and foundation brick will be evaluated for any signs of fungus or mold. It will be removed with bleach water and a natural bristle brush. If needed, additional areas of the facings will be steam cleaned to remove ivy, in accordance with the guidance of the Department of the Interior Preservation Brief No. 1.

Foundation brick will be replaced or repaired as necessary. The foundation facings will be painted.

Deteriorated mortar joints will be raked out with hand tools to a depth of 2” and re-pointed with new mortar. New mortar will match the historic mortar in strength and composition, and the joints will replicate the size and tooling of the original joints, in accordance with the guidance of the Department of the Interior Preservation Brief No. 2.

After the foundation brick is rehabilitated, the limestone facings will be reinstalled with missing or damaged pieces being replaced.

Proper drainage will be provided by downspout repairs (see above), by selected regrading of earth around the foundation, and by removal of excessive plant growth adjacent to the foundation.

Impact will be the rehabilitation of the original foundation configuration, protection of the building’s structural integrity and replacement of important architectural details.
#4

Front Porch

Existing feature and detailed condition: The front porch of the home was removed many years ago. There is a cement slab and steps, which could be the original porch floor and steps, that are partially covered with brick pavers and ornamental concrete. It appears that some of the limestone facing above the slab has been damaged. There are recesses in the brick above the porch where the associated roof structure once was located. It is difficult to assess the overall condition due to the excess bricks.


Photo #    51                       
Proposed work, materials and standards: All the brick pavers and debris will be removed from the porch slab and steps. The slab and steps will be cleaned with water and a natural bristle brush in accordance with the guidance of the Department of the Interior Preservation Brief No. 2. The resulting condition will be evaluated and a plan will be developed for any additional repairs that may be needed. The broken limestone facings will be replaced after the brick has been restored in accordance with the guidance of the Department of the Interior Preservation Brief No. 1.

As part of a future unrelated project, the porch will be reconstructed based on the 1932 photo, using brick evidence, historical evidence of similar extant examples and period references as the basis for the new design. 

There will be no impact on significant historic materials or designs, and the historic building will be enhanced by a clean and safe front porch.

#5

Rear Wing

Existing feature and detailed condition: Rear two story wing in seriously deteriorated condition. Mansard roof, dormers and gutters are addressed within the overall roofing and guttering plans. The foundation and brick are addressed within the overall foundation and brick/masonry plans. The rear wall, 2 exterior doors, interior first and second floors have all collapsed into a heap of rubble in the cellar. The northern exterior wall is covered in invasive ivy. 

Photo #  68 – 69   
Proposed work, materials and standards: Indiana Landmarks will stabilize the west wall prior to closing. Depending on the stabilization methods and materials, this area may be covered with an appropriate material to make it water tight as the initial step until the roof can be stabilized.

The rubble will be removed from the interior and exterior of the wing.

Ivy will be removed from walls and any ivy residue will be cleaned off with steam in accordance with the guidance of the Department of the Interior Preservation Brief No. 1.

Indiana Landmarks will rebuild the collapsed wall after the rubble is removed.

When the brick and roof projects are complete, a replacement door will be installed in the location of the original north door of the west wing. Selection of the replacement door and hardware will be determined at that point, after evaluation of what items are available, similar extant examples and period references. 

Impact will be the restoration of the original rear wing.



#6

Corbels and Decorative Work

Existing feature and detailed condition: Most of the original corbels are gone. There is one small section on the north side of the house, above the bay window, that retains half of the original on the exterior wall. The pattern is 2 large corbels, 2 small corbels and then 2 large corbels. The original design would have included 2 more small corbels and then 2 more large ones.  In addition, there is a piece of decorative wood that the smaller corbels rest on.

There is decorative scroll work trim on the third floor dormer windows, although most is currently missing due to the condition of the dormers.

Photo #  51 – 54   Drawing #
Proposed work, materials and standards:  Measure, detail and document all sections where the original corbels and trim were located. All existing corbels and trim will be removed.  The corbels and trim will be evaluated to determine if any can be cleaned, rehabilitated and reused. New wooden corbels and trim will be fabricated. The existing deteriorated corbels will be used as patterns for the new wooden corbels and trim. Reconstructed corbels and trim will be installed in original configuration around perimeter of tower and mansard roof (after the brickwork is completed.)

Prior to removal, all dormers will be measured, detailed and documented including the trim design and where it was located. The existing trim will be evaluated to determine if any can be cleaned, rehabilitated and reused. New trim will be fabricated. The existing deteriorated trim will be used as patterns for the new wooden trim. Reconstructed trim will be installed in the original configuration on the dormers after they are completed.

Impact will be the restoration of these important aspects of the fa├žade’s original appearance.
#7

Brick Walls and Stonework

Existing feature and detailed condition: Exterior brickwork is in extremely poor condition on all elevations. The west wall of the west wing has collapsed between missing rear doors. There is damage to an area of brick on the lower left corner of the wall. Both the north and south side of the rear wing have an ivy infestation, which prevents much evaluation of the north wall. There is peeling white paint on the stone of the window keystones, the sills and the bay window trim. In many places, there is paint, caulk or other substances which were used for “repair” that now covers the brick and mortar, making the joints indistinguishable. There is a large area of graffiti on the north side of the tower wing. There are many areas of damage to both the bricks and mortar due to water and the lack of functioning gutters and downspouts. There are areas of red paint and peeling white paint on the brick. There is a large, boarded up hole in the south wall of the main building, which was likely the opening of the original bay window into the dining room. In many areas, mortar joints are eroded and in need of repointing. There are several areas of missing brick. There is an area above the front porch which shows severe water damage and growth of vegetation between the bricks.

Photo #  55 – 66  
#7 cont. 
Proposed work, materials and standards: Per the Standards under Building Exterior Masonry, it is not recommended removing paint from historically painted masonry.  It is recommended to remove damaged or deteriorated paint only to the next sound layer using the gentlest method possible (e.g., hand scraping) prior to repainting.

The back wall of the rear wing will be stabilized and rebuilt by Indiana Landmarks.

The project will require consultation with a masonry expert to determine the following: original composition of the brick and mortar, plan for paint removal and cleaning, plan for repair and/or replacement of damaged brick, repointing of mortar and exterior painting. It is likely that steam cleaning will be required on the areas that were covered by ivy and a poultice will be required for cleaning and removal of graffiti on north side of tower.

This plan will be executed to restore the structural integrity of the building. Appropriate brick and mortar will be used to maintain the buildings structural integrity but will not attempt to visually match the existing brick and mortar. Since this building has historically been painted, as indicated by the multiple layers evident on the brick, it will be repainted with an appropriate paint in a period color scheme.   

The stonework, including trim, keystones and sills will be cleaned as appropriate and repainted with an appropriate paint in a period color scheme.

The rear wall will be constructed in the previous configuration including the replacement of 1 (to the north) of the exterior doors at the original height. The replacement bay window on the south side of the building will be constructed according to the foundation evidence and will mirror the existing north side bay window. No other substantial alterations to the brick walls are proposed.

Impact will be the restoration of the original configuration of the building, protection of the building’s structural integrity and replacement of important architectural details.
#8

Windows

Only a limited exterior evaluation of the windows was possible. Windows on the first and second floor appear to be one-over-one single-hung wood windows are all in extremely poor condition (due to water damage). Most windows in the main wing of the house have stone keystones and sills. Many have broken glass and some are boarded up especially on the 1st floor, likely for security purposes. There are no storm windows in place; however, some windows have been made watertight with a Plexiglas cover. The overall condition of the wood and the window function has not been determined.

The 2nd & 3rd floor dormer boxes are all severely deteriorated and will be rebuilt during the roofing project. The 3rd floor windows do not appear to open, however, they may pivot open. The rear wing dormers and windows are shaped differently from the arched windows and dormers on the rest of the house.

Photo # 67 – 69   
Proposed work, materials and standards: The initial steps will be to make the windows watertight in order to stop interior and exterior damage.

Each window configuration and condition will be documented. If any windows are in moderate to good condition, they will have appropriate maintenance completed. Any window that can be repaired will retain as much of the original materials as possible. The majority, if not all of the windows, will need to be replaced. The original configuration will be maintained and the same kind of material as the original will be used.

Impact will be the maintenance of the original configuration of the windows, protection of the building’s structural integrity and replacement of important architectural details.
#9

Front Door

The front door is currently covered with plywood from the outside. From an interior inspection, it does not appear that the current door was original to the house; however, it appears to have been installed prior to the 1930’s photo. The door has a large glass panel.

Photo # 67            
Proposed work, materials and standards: Initially, the plywood will be removed and the existing front door will be put into storage. Due to the glass panel, it will be replaced with an all-steel door for security purposes during the project.

After construction, further research and evaluation of the condition of the door will be completed and a decision will be made regarding repair or replacement of the door.





Bungalow – Craftsman Style circa 1910

#1

Roof

Existing feature and detailed condition:  Condition of roof was examined only from ground level. There is a steep light gray asphalt shingled roof with dormers front and back. The same roofing materials exist on the dormers, although the roof has very small slope. There is some minor damage to shingles and fascia. No evidence of leakage or damaged decking was observed.

Photo #  70 – 72 & 74 
Proposed work, materials and standards: The first step will be to conduct a more thorough evaluation of the roof and to develop a plan for maintenance and repair. Damaged shingles and fascia will be repaired or replaced.

Impact will be the no change to the original roof configuration or materials and protection of the building’s structural integrity.
#2

Guttering

Existing feature and detailed condition: Aluminum guttering and downspouts with some minor damage and missing pieces. No leaders found.

Photo # 70 & 71   
Proposed work, materials and standards: Existing gutters and downspouts will be repaired or replaced with new PVC downspouts in appropriate locations. PVC downspouts will be used to deter theft. Leaders will be installed at the foot of each downspout to carry rainwater away from the foundation.

Impact will be the restoration of the gutter configuration, protection of the building’s structural integrity and the building will be protected by proper drainage of rainwater.
#3

Exterior walls

Existing feature and detailed condition:  Exterior walls are in fair condition. Lower floor wood siding has been partially painted blue over old white paint. The enclosed front porch paint is peeling. Gable surface appears to be cedar shingles. The existing white paint appears mostly OK.

Photo #  70, 71, 73, 76 

Proposed work, materials and standards: The wood siding will be cleaned, peeling paint will be removed and painted maroon. The wood shingles will be cleaned, peeling paint will be removed, missing shingles will be replaced and the gables will be painted white.

Impact is no change in the historical materials or configuration, protection of the buildings structural integrity.
#4

Windows

Existing features and detailed condition: The window conditions between fair condition and poor condition. There are several replacement windows. Storm windows are missing. Several windows have broken glass or are boarded over.

Photo # 70, 71, 73, 75, 77 
Proposed work, materials and standards: The windows will be evaluated individually and a plan for future work will be developed. The boarded up windows will be repaired. Storm windows will be purchased and hung for the replacement windows. All broken glass will be replaced as needed. Caulking will be replaced as needed.

Impact is no change in the historical materials or configuration of the windows, protection of the buildings structural integrity.
#5

Interior surfaces

Existing feature and detailed condition: Most interior surfaces are in fair condition. There are some holes in the walls and loose ceiling tiles. The walls in the enclosed back porch appear to be partially painted barn siding. The carpets are very worn, dirty and stained.

Photo # not available
Proposed work, materials and standards: All carpet is to be removed from the house. The floors will be repaired as needed. The tile flooring in the kitchen will be removed and replaced. The flooring in the bathrooms will be removed and replaced. The plaster will be repaired as needed. The ceiling tiles will be repaired. The walls & ceilings will be painted.

Impact is no change in the historical materials or configuration of the interior surfaces, protection of the buildings structural integrity.
#6

Interior systems/fixtures

Existing feature and detailed condition: Unable to completely evaluate the plumbing, sewer, HVAC or electrical systems at this time. All bathroom fixtures are corroded. Kitchen sink is damaged.

Photo # not available
Proposed work, materials and standards: A thorough evaluation will be completed for all interior systems/fixtures.  The bathroom and kitchen fixtures will be cleaned, repaired and replaced as needed. The HVAC units will be refurbished and a central air conditioning unit will be installed.

Impact is no change in the historical materials or configuration of the interior surfaces, protection of the buildings structural integrity.
#7

Site exterior

Existing feature and detailed condition: See Property Overview above.

Photo # not available
Proposed work, materials and standards: The yard will be reconfigured for parking. Rezoning will be sought to support the occupancy of ARE. A company sign will be erected.
#8

Basement/foundation

Existing feature and detailed condition: Difficult to evaluate without adequate lighting. Appeared to be in fair condition although badly littered.

Photo# not available
Proposed work, materials and standards: A thorough evaluation will be completed of the basement/foundation.  The rubbish will be removed and the basement will be cleaned and painted as needed. The basement will be evaluated for leaks.

Impact is no change in the historical materials or configuration of the interior surfaces, protection of the buildings structural integrity.







Section 3


High-level Timeline


A much more extensive timeline with detailed tasks and details will be developed as part of the overall project. Many tasks will take place at the same time

In process:
·         Prepare current home for sale
·         Complete proposal for Indiana Landmarks
·         Prepare detailed timeline for project
·         Continue research on materials, costs  and best practices
·         Gather additional information from construction experts

Begin as soon as access is approved:
·         Remove trash from grounds
·         Begin yard maintenance and mowing program
·         Remove trash from garage
·         Get estimates on construction fencing

Once property is sold to Indiana Landmarks:
·         Stabilize back wall of west wing
·         Remove trash from west wing
·         Reconstruct back wall of west wing

After purchase is complete:
·         Install secure door on front of Horner House
·         Secure all 3 structures and replace locks
·         Install construction fencing
·         Obtain construction estimates
·         Tarp roof and secure windows
·         Turn on utilities and complete repair work on Bungalow
·         Move into Bungalow
·         Document dormers, remove and secure openings
·         Remove salvage and rubbish from yard, houses and garage
·         Complete detailed assessment of all 3 structures & adjust plans
·         Obtain permits
·         Subprojects on Horner House – prioritized
1.     Remove old roofing, replace damaged wood, install bladder roofing, temporary gutters and downspouts
2.     Stabilize the structural flooring (recommended by structural engineer prior to brick work)
3.     Install subfloor
4.     Clean, repair, replace and/or repoint brick
5.     Clean other masonry
6.     Rebuild dormers, install TruSlate roof, rebuild cornices & gutters, install flashing and downspouts
7.     Rebuild and replace windows
8.     Paint exterior
9.     Repair sidewalks and front porch
10.  Demolish garage & remove construction fencing



Estimated Timeframe


Based on the above timeline, and the assumptions detailed earlier in this proposal, the owners believe they can complete the proposed Scope of Work within 48 months of the owners’ purchase of the property from Indiana Landmarks. This timeframe is contingent upon:

1.     Receiving of necessary permits and rezoning in a timely manner
2.     Obtaining the necessary funding for construction and restoration costs in a timely manner
3.     Selling of the owners’ existing residence
4.     Confirming that the preliminary evaluations are substantially accurate, and no major additional issues are found
5.     There being no delays due to weather, availability of construction materials, workload of construction subcontractors, or other circumstances beyond our control





APPENDIX A
Current State Photos from March & April 2011
Property Overview



#1

Lot – Remove trash, leaves & over growth



General trash in yard, old leaves and over growth on fence needing removal. There are other many other areas that will also require clean-up. Column and interior fence behind Bungalow


Fence – Chain Link - Complete installation of the chain link fence in the rear yard behind the Bungalow



# 2

Lot – Remove piles of dressed stone, marble pillars, etc.

Art deco column that needs to be removed from in front of the porch of the Horner House – front yard.



# 3

Lot – Remove piles of dressed stone, marble pillars, etc.

There are 2 marble column bases that will need to be removed from the side yard of the Horner House.


#4

Lot – Remove piles of dressed stone, marble pillars, etc.

One of several marble pillars that will need to be removed from the yard.



#5

Lot – Remove piles of dressed stone, marble pillars, etc.

Within the over growth is an old wagon that needs to be removed from this area of the yard.



#6

Lot – Remove piles of dressed stone, marble pillars, etc.
 
Pile of marble columns that need to be removed from the yard.



#7

Lot – Remove piles of dressed stone, marble pillars, etc.

Pillar that needs to be removed from the yard.



#8



Lot – Remove piles of dressed stone, marble pillars, etc.

 
Dressed stone that needs to be removed from the yard.



#9

Lot 

 Remove piles of dressed stone, marble pillars, etc.

Stone and metal pole that need to be removed from the front yard of the Bungalow.
 
Driveway

Clean up weeds and grass. Add a truck load of gravel.



#10

Lot – Remove piles of dressed stone, marble pillars, etc.

Granite slabs lining the sidewalk of the Horner House which need to be removed – northern view.




#11

Lot – Remove piles of dressed stone, marble pillars, etc.

Granite slabs lining the sidewalk of the Horner House which need to be removed – southern view.
 
Front walkways

Repair Horner House steps.




#12

Lot – Fill and cap cisterns.

Covered cistern in yard on south side of Horner House that needs to be filled.




#13

Lot – Fill and cap cisterns.

Cistern to the west of the rear wing that needs to be filled and covered.



#14

 
Lot – Remove building materials from collapsed back wall and salvaging any undamaged brick or other materials.

When the rear wall of the rear wing collapsed, building materials were strewn into the yard. They need to be removed.


#15

Fence

 Wrought Iron - If any wrought iron fencing is determined to be original to the property and is salvageable, it will be cleaned of flaking paint and rust with wire brush, primed and repainted.


#16

Fence

Wrought Iron - If any wrought iron fencing is determined to be original to the property and is salvageable, it will be cleaned of flaking paint and rust with wire brush, primed and repainted.


#17


Fence

Corrugated metal – Corrugated metal fencing will be removed and replaced with more appropriate fencing.



#18


Fence

Wooden - If any wooden fencing is salvageable and appropriate to keep, it will be cleaned, primed and painted or stained. Remove dilapidated perimeter fencing.  Remove interior fencing.



#19


Fence

Wooden - If any wooden fencing is salvageable and appropriate to keep, it will be cleaned, primed and painted or stained. Remove dilapidated perimeter fencing.  Remove interior fencing.



#20




Fence



Wooden - If any wooden fencing is salvageable and appropriate to keep, it will be cleaned, primed and painted or stained. Remove dilapidated perimeter fencing.  Remove interior fencing.

 

Landscaping


Remove the mulberry trees.


#21

Fence

Wooden - If any wooden fencing is salvageable and appropriate to keep, it will be cleaned, primed and painted or stained. Remove dilapidated perimeter fencing.  Remove interior fencing.


#22

Landscaping

Remove honey locust tree near the house.


#22

Garage

Complete detailed evaluation of garage to determine whether minimal repair will stabilize the building for storage of materials during the preservation of the house.


#23

Garage

Have tested for termites and treat if necessary. Repair rafters and any other infested/damaged areas.


#24

Garage

Have tested for termites and treat if necessary. Repair rafters and any other infested/damaged areas.


#25

Garage

Clean out refuse.



#26

Garage

Clean out refuse.


#27

Garage

Complete required repairs, including patch the roof, replace broken windows, paint exterior.


#28

Garage

Repair/replace the barn siding, metal panels and paint.


#29


Street view of the Horner House as it stands today, from across the street.


#30

Horner House as it stands today, from the front yard.


#31

Horner House in approximately 1997 (photo taken from Greater Irvington: Architecture, People and Places on the Indianapolis Eastside, 1997)


#32

Horner House in approximately 1932 (photo taken from Indianapolis Star article dated April 4, 1932)


#33

Roof

The main house and rear wing have mansard roofs consisting of bladder type roofing on the flat portions and standard slate on the sides. There were cornices at the top, soffits with gutters at the bottom and painted boards at the corners.

Note corner trim and cornice.

Gutters, Downspouts, Soffits – Soffits and gutters are missing on this side.


#34

Roof

The main house and rear wing have mansard roofs consisting of bladder type roofing on the flat portions and standard slate on the sides. There were cornices at the top, soffits with gutters at the bottom and painted boards at the corners.

This area of the roof shows the old corners with built in gutters and painted boards at the roof ridge.


#35

Roof

The slate on the side surfaces has been painted, dark red and light gray. It appears that most of the light gray paint is gone from the rear wing roof.


#36

Roof

Areas of the slate that were previously hidden but are now visible are a medium gray color. The shingles are laid in a very distinctive pattern, however, many have broken or fallen off. It appears that there is solid wood sheathing beneath where the slates are missing.

See gray color at top shingles. Where the shingles are completely missing the wood sheathing can be seen.


#37

Roof

The roofing around all the dormer windows is deteriorated. The window sills and adjacent roofing are missing for most of them.

Photo shows an example of missing roofing and sill on dormer window.
The shingles are laid in a very distinctive pattern, however, many have broken or fallen off.
There appears to be 3 rows of squared off shingles, 3 rows of v shaped shingles and finally 3 rows of squared off shingles on the shorter roofs. On the rear wing, the rows of squared off shingles repeat 6 times with the 3 rows of v shaped ones.


#38

Roof

A large portion of the rear wing roof is covered in ivy.

The ivy will be removed from the roof. Special care will be used, especially on the rear wing roof, to prevent additional damage to the brick during this process.


#39

Roof

A portion of the mansard roof above the rear wing has had all the slate shingles removed and has been covered in what looks like tar.


#40

Roof

On the south side of the main house, the mansard roof from the chimney to the west corner has had the slate removed and has been replaced with asphalt shingles.


#41



Roof



It appears the 2 windows in the mansard roof above the exposed roof sole plate at the back of the rear wing are at risk of falling out due to the missing roofing.


Photo shows the exposed roof sole plate and 1 of the unstable windows.


#42

Roof

The tower wing has only a low pitched roof where the tower has been removed. The bay window roof is covered with a bladder-type roofing. Both roofs have cornices. Originally, there was wrought iron cresting on the tower and bay window roofs. These no longer exist. 


#43 

Roof

The roof of the bay window appears wrinkled, in bad repair with a large area covered with shards of glass from a broken window.


#44

Gutters, Downspouts, Soffits

No ground-level drainage is provided for the downspouts, and rainwater is dropping directly against the foundation.

Foundation – Several corners of the east side of the main house have had water from downspouts pouring directly between the facings and the foundation.


#45

Foundation

The facings are missing on the northwest and southwest corners of the main wing. The uncovered areas of the foundation on the main wing of the house appear to have some crumbling bricks and missing mortar.

Photo shows northwest interior corner between the main structure and the west wing.


#46

Foundation

The rear wing has no facings and the foundation has missing bricks and appears to be in very poor condition.

Photo shows one area of rear wing.


#47 

Foundation

There are foundation remains of a south porch and presumed old west facing addition.

Photo shows foundation remains of part of the presumed old west facing addition.


#48

Foundation

There are foundation remains of a south porch and presumed old west facing addition.

Photo shows south porch with foundation.


#49 

Foundation – There are foundation remains of a south porch and presumed old west facing addition. There is also foundational evidence and remains of a bay window area of the dining room that correspond with a covered hole in the dining room wall.

Photo shows more of the south porch foundation & limestone/brick from the bay window foundation.


#50

 Foundation – There are foundation remains of a south porch and presumed old west facing addition. There is also foundational evidence and remains of a bay window area of the dining room that correspond with a covered hole in the dining room wall.

Photo shows more of the south porch foundation & limestone/brick from the bay window foundation.


#51

Brackets and Decorative Trim – Most of the original brackets are gone. There is one small section on the north side of the house, above the bay window, that retains half of the original on the exterior wall. The pattern is 2 large brackets, 2 small brackets and then 2 large brackets. The original design would have included 2 more small brackets and then 2 more large ones.  In addition, there is a piece of decorative wood that the smaller brackets rest on.

Photo shows bracket design and spacing.



#52

Brackets and Decorative Trim – Most of the original brackets are gone. There is one small section on the north side of the house, above the bay window, that retains half of the original on the exterior wall. The pattern is 2 large brackets, 2 small brackets and then 2 large brackets. The original design would have included 2 more small brackets and then 2 more large ones.  In addition, there is a piece of decorative wood that the smaller brackets rest on.

Photo shows surviving example of bracket design from front and side.


#53

Brackets and Decorative Trim – There is decorative scroll work trim on the third floor dormer windows, although most is currently missing due to the condition of the dormers.

Photo shows mostly intact trim above window.


#54

Brackets and Decorative Trim – There is decorative scroll work trim on the third floor dormer windows, although most is currently missing due to the condition of the dormers.

Photo shows best remaining example of dormer window style and trim.


#55

Brick walls and Stonework

The west wall of the west wing has collapsed between missing rear doors. There is damage to an area of brick on the lower left corner of the wall.

Photo shows the west wall needing stabilization


#56 

Brick walls and Stonework

Both the north and south side of the rear wing have an ivy infestation, which prevents much evaluation of the north wall.

Photo shows ivy and damage to the lower left corner.


#57

Brick walls and Stonework

There is peeling white paint on the stone of the window keystones, the sills and the bay window trim. In many places, there is paint, caulk or other substances which were used for “repair” that now covers the brick and mortar, making the joints indistinguishable.

Photo shows the surviving north bay.


#58

Brick walls and Stonework

There is a large area of graffiti on the north side of the tower wing. There are many areas of damage to both the bricks and mortar due to water and the lack of functioning gutters and downspouts.


#59 

Brick walls and Stonework

There is peeling white paint on the stone of the window keystones, the sills and the bay window trim. In many places, there is paint, caulk or other substances which were used for “repair” that now covers the brick and mortar, making the joints indistinguishable.




#60

Brick walls and Stonework

In many places, there is paint, caulk or other substances which were used for “repair” that now covers the brick and mortar, making the joints indistinguishable. There are many areas of damage to both the bricks and mortar due to water and the lack of functioning gutters and downspouts. There are areas of peeling red paint on the brick. In many areas, mortar joints are eroded and in need of repointing. There are several areas of missing brick.


#61 

Brick walls and Stonework

In many places, there is paint, caulk or other substances which were used for “repair” that now covers the brick and mortar, making the joints indistinguishable. There is a large, boarded up hole in the south wall of the main building, which was likely the opening of the original bay window into the dining room. There are several areas of missing brick.


#62 

Brick walls and Stonework


In many places, there is paint, caulk or other substances which were used for “repair” that now covers the brick and mortar, making the joints indistinguishable. There are areas of red paint and peeling white paint. In many areas, mortar joints are eroded and in need of repointing.


#63 

Brick walls and Stonework

There is an area above the front porch which shows severe water damage and growth of vegetation between the bricks.


#64 

Brick walls and Stonework

In many places, there is paint, caulk or other substances which were used for “repair” that now covers the brick and mortar, making the joints indistinguishable. 


#65 

Brick walls and Stonework

In many places, there is paint, caulk or other substances which were used for “repair” that now covers the brick and mortar, making the joints indistinguishable.


#66 

Brick walls and Stonework

In many places, there is paint, caulk or other substances which were used for “repair” that now covers the brick and mortar, making the joints indistinguishable.


#67


Windows – Shows the configuration and condition of the windows on the east and north sides of the main wing.



Front Door – Shows boarded up front door.
  


#68 

Windows – Shows the configuration and condition of the windows on the north and west sides of the west wing.

Rear Wing – Rear two-story wing in seriously deteriorated condition. The rear wall, 2 exterior doors, interior first and second floors have all collapsed into a heap of ruble in the cellar. The northern exterior wall is covered in invasive ivy. 


#69

Windows – Shows the configuration and condition of the windows on the south sides of the rear and main wings.

Rear Wing – Rear two-story wing in seriously deteriorated condition.

Photo shows view of house from southwest.



#70

Front view of house

Roof – no damage evident

Gutters – missing PVC

Exterior wall – some missing cedar shingles, peeling paint

Windows – boarded up and need maintenance


#71 

Rear view of house

Roof – small area of damage

Gutters – missing PVC and downspout on right corner

 Exterior wall – peeling and incomplete paint


#72

Roof

Shingle detail


#73

Exterior wall – incomplete and peeling paint. Cedar shingles damaged and need paint

Foundation – appears in fair condition


#74

Roof

There is some minor damage to dormer shingles and fascia.


#75

South elevation

Exterior wall – needs repair and paint. There is some minor damage to gable shingles.


Note boarded up windows


#76

South elevation detail

Exterior wall – needs repair and paint


#77 
South elevation detail

Windows – several windows have broken glass

Porch needs cleaned up and minor repairs, including railing.

 










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